What Types Of Grass Are Best For Your Lawn?

Types Of Grass

Emma DowneyByEmma Downey
Updated on 10/4/2022

Consider grass to be nothing more than, well, grass? It turns out that there are quite a few Types Of Grass blanketing the lawns of today's houses, and each of these forms of grass has its texture, requirements for upkeep, and advantages. And depending on where you live, you'll have much more success with a particular type of grass over a different kind than you would with the same amount of success with the other type.

Many individuals move into homes where the lawn has already been created, so they don't have to make any choices about which kind of grass would be the most suitable. However, suppose you have a good understanding of the distinctions between the different grass varieties. In that case, it will be easier to determine what you're dealing with and what needs to be done to ensure that your yard continues to appear as healthy as possible.

In the following, we have provided an overview of the fundamental characteristics shared by many of the most popular species of grass across the nation. Here is everything you need to know to attain absolute perfection with your lawn, whether you're trying to figure out how to care for your yard correctly or beginning from scratch with your landscaping (sorry, we had to).

The Question Is, How Many Different Kinds Of Grass Are There?

How Many Different Kinds Of Grass Are There

Poaceae is the family of plants to which grasses belong; within this family, there are around 11,000 distinct species of grasses. But don't worry—when it comes to creating or identifying your yard, you won't need to consider any of the 11,000 distinct species of grass!

Instead, around a dozen various kinds of grass are typically utilized in North American lawns, and most properties have a combination of two or more different types of grass.

In the United States, lawns often fall into one of two main categories:

  • Warm season grasses are different species of grass that thrive in warmer temperatures, such as those found in the states of the South and Southwest.
  • Cool season grasses thrive in regions with lower average temperatures, such as the Northeastern United States and the Pacific Northwest.

If you choose grasses that thrive during the warm season in an area with a cooler climate, or vice versa, you will almost surely have some difficulty maintaining the healthy appearance of your lawn. Because of this, it is a good idea to stick to the varieties of grass that are the most excellent match for where you live, and then limit it down even further to the grasses that give the look and degree of upkeep that you're looking.

Here Are The Top 10 Types Of Grass Grown In The United States.

Grass

Following a brief introduction to the world of grass variations, we will now discuss the types of grass most frequently employed in the United States and the seasons in which they thrive best.

Bentgrass

Bentgrass

  • Season: Cool
  • The texture is soft and thick, and the color is medium green.
  • High level of maintenance

Because it has modest growth potential and a delicate feel, bentgrass is typically seen on golf courses located in northern regions. Bentgrass needs a significant amount of mowing, fertilizing, and fungicide application, in addition to watering on an almost daily basis, even though its deep color and velvety feel can make it appear an excellent choice for residential properties. You might want to steer clear of this thick kind if you're not playing on a fairway.

Bermuda Grass

Bermuda Grass

  • Season: Warm
  • Texture and color: Dense and deep green
  • High level of maintenance

Bermuda grass is a widespread choice for residential lawns in addition to being a popular option for use on golf courses. This type does have high care needs, including the need to be watered regularly, but it can be mowed down to a low height, making it an excellent choice for high-traffic yards like those with children and dogs. Even though it grows best during the warm season, many individuals in the central states, such as the southern portion of the Midwest, have had success even though it is a warm-season grass.

Bluegrass

Bluegrass

  • Season: Cool
  • The hue and texture are soft and dark green.
  • Maintenance: Medium

It's possible that bluegrass, or Kentucky bluegrass, is the kind of grass most commonly seen in northern households. Bluegrass thrives when grown from seed or sod and can withstand lower temperatures; nevertheless, it is not a lover of being shaded and is typically mixed with ryegrass and fine fescue.

Centipede

Centipede

  • Season: Warm
  • In terms of length and hue, the texture is coarse, and the color is a pale green.
  • The medium-low effort required for upkeep

It is suited for usage in warm and tepid climates, especially the central states, which do not often fit into one specific temperature group and create a thick, mat-like turf with relatively moderate care requirements. It works best in conditions detrimental to other species of grass, such as high levels of nitrogen in the soil, but it tolerates partial shade. It also thrives in conditions unsuitable for different types of grass.

Dichondra

Dichondra

  • Season: Warm
  • Dense and a pale or vivid green hue, depending on the texture.
  • High level of maintenance

The dichondra grass is simple to recognize because, rather than having blades, it displays itself with small spherical leaves. Even though this grass is susceptible to disease and insects, homeowners in warm climates prefer it because it provides dense ground cover while still being mowed like traditional types of grass, even though it requires frequent fertilization and watering. The states of California and Arizona are where you are most likely to come across them.

Fine Fescue

Fine Fescue

  • Cool is the Season
  • Fine-grained textures and a drab olive green tint
  • The medium-low effort required for upkeep

The term "fine fescue" refers to a kind of grass that can refer to several species belonging to the fescue family. Each of these grasses has a blade that is soft but needle-like in appearance. Fine fescue is one of the most common grasses used in combination with Kentucky bluegrass and ryegrass because it thrives in colder circumstances and can withstand shade but cannot stand the heat. The states included in the North Central and Northeastern regions are home to a wide variety of cultivars belonging to this grass species.

Floratam

Floratam

  • Season: Warm
  • Coarse in texture and dark forest green in hue
  • Maintenance: Medium

Floratam is yet another kind of the St. Augustine grass, typically located in the dry regions that run along the Gulf Coast. To flourish, it needs a lot of water and warm air, and the blade that it produces is relatively wide and has a rough texture, which is a favorite among many people in the South. If you reside in a consistently hot and humid place, like Louisiana or Florida, flora tam should feel ideally at home.

Ryegrass

Ryegrass

  • Season: Cool
  • Both in terms of texture and hue, a soft and dark green
  • Maintenance: Medium

This delicate fescue species are commonly used in northern lawns, frequently combined with Kentucky bluegrass and other fast-growing grass. In general, it is relatively simple to maintain in milder areas and germinates rapidly for rapid development. However, it may experience some difficulty in icy conditions, such as in the northern parts of Minnesota and Michigan (a big win when your growing season is short).

Tall Fescue

Tall Fescue

  • Season: Cool
  • Coarse in texture and dark forest green in hue
  • The medium-low effort required for upkeep

This form of fine fescue is not nearly as popular as its acceptable relative. Still, because of its capacity to handle the heat this cold season, the grass is an option that is reasonably widespread in both the northern and the southern states. However, because it can develop weed-like characteristics, it is not commonly included in residential seed mixes. Instead, it is utilized more frequently on sporting fields and other locations that need to withstand intensive use and have significant foot traffic.

Zoysia

Zoysia

  • Season: Warm
  • The texture is prickly, and the hue is a medium green.
  • Maintenance: Medium

Zoysia is a type of grass that looks similar to carpet and can often be found in the central region of the United States and further east in the Carolinas. Although "prickly" may not seem like a quality you would want in your lawn, many people choose this type of grass because it is resistant to heat, drought, and heavy foot traffic, and it does not need to be watered regularly. In addition, it does not require fertilization. Despite this, it soon turns brown when the temperature drops below freezing, and if it isn't mowed frequently enough, it will form seed heads.

Choosing The Types Of Grass To Use

Choosing The Types Of Grass To Use

If you are establishing a new lawn, you will want to select the types Of Grass that thrive in your region, given the weather, the soil, and the other characteristics of your yard. To determine the type of soil you are dealing with, we suggest beginning your research with the Web Soil Survey provided by the USDA and speaking with a landscaper in your area for additional advice. Instead of merely crossing your fingers and wishing for the best, it is wiser to conduct some study ahead of time so that you may select the appropriate kind or varieties of seed and sod. This is because sod and seed can become rather expensive.