Lavender Plant Care

Lavender Plant Care

Emma DowneyByEmma Downey
Updated on 8/13/2022

Lavender (Lavandula)

In addition to being a beautiful perennial bloom, lavender is an excellent choice for your garden as a plant that will attract a variety of pollinators, including bees, butterflies, and other insects. This indigenous species from the Mediterranean region is cultivated, produced, and enjoyed in various global locations.

Lavender (Lavandula)

Plant them beside your herb garden, in a bed of perennial flowers, or in pots so you can get a good whiff of their aroma up close. If you follow our instructions on cultivating lavender plants, you will be thrilled with the beauty of the plants as well as the value of having them in your yard.

When To Plant Lavender And Where

Light: Lavender requires well-drained soil and receives whole light to develop to its most significant potential. Afternoon shade may help them survive in environments where summers are very scorching.

Soil: Because lavender thrives in low to moderate fertility soils, you shouldn't add any organic matter to the ground before planting it. The ideal pH range for lavender's growing environment is neutral and slightly alkaline. You should add lime to the soil to increase the pH level to somewhere around 7.0. A straightforward soil test should be carried out for the best possible outcomes.

Spacing: Plants should be spaced anywhere from 1 to 3 feet apart, although the exact distance may vary according to the kind.

Time of Planting: If you live in a location cooler than Zone 6 (Zone 6-1), you should sow your seeds in the spring or the beginning of summer. Planting should be done in the early fall for places warmer than zone 6 (7-10), as this allows the roots to establish themselves when the weather is cool and wet during the winter.

Lavender Planting Instructions: A Step-By-Step Guide

1. Begin with robust plants that already have established root systems.

2. Dig a planting hole three times as deep and four times as broad as the root ball of the lavender plant you will be planting. When planting various plants in a single bed, you can either amend the soil in each planting hole or amend the ground across the whole bed before planting. Mixing sand, gravel, or both with the earth in a container can provide a well-draining soil mixture that may use for planting.

3. If the plant's roots are clinging to the sides of the container, you can "rough up" the roots to stimulate development in a more radical direction.

Lavender Planting Instructions: A Step-By-Step Guide

4. When planting your lavender, ensure that the root ball's top is at the same level as the line where the dirt begins. Press firmly around the plant when you have finished filling up the soil surrounding it.

5. Add water to the soil to compact and eliminate air gaps. In the following weeks, you should only water your lavender if the circumstances in your garden and the plant itself are arid. Keep in mind that lavender grows best in soil that drains quickly and does not like to have "wet feet" or be in the water for an extended period since this can cause the roots to rot.

Care Instructions For Lavender Plants

  • Lavender, when grown in warmer regions, develops the habit of becoming a round, bushy shrub. This perennial grows more slowly in more excellent areas than other types of plants. In regions with high humidity levels, leaving enough room for optimal ventilation is essential to avoid the growth of fungus and powdery mildew. Look at the types you are growing to get an idea of how big they will get when fully grown.
  • Lavender plants can grow up to three feet tall and broad but do not need to be staked because they only reach one to three feet.
  • When it comes to watering, ensure that you give young plants plenty of it. Lavender is a plant that can withstand dry conditions after it has been established and does not require frequent watering. Lavender plants are commonly subjected to stress as a result of receiving an excessive amount of water.

Care Instructions For Lavender Plants

  • When applying fertilizer, as with watering, less is more when growing lavender. There should be no need to provide supplemental nutrition for your lavender plants.
  • Mulching: Mulching isn't often necessary for drought-resistant plants like lavender; in all but the most extreme circumstances, the plant shouldn't need mulch to help retain soil moisture. If you decide to use mulch, choose fine-grained bark or gravel, and be sure to leave a space of at least a few inches around the plant crown. If you don't, your lavender might end up rotting. Mulch made of light-colored gravel or sand can assist keep the soil warm while promoting drainage. Mulch can also help keep the plant itself warm.
  • Lavender is a plant that blooms in the summer and benefits from trimming and pruning. The flower stalks can be plucked and utilized either fresh or dried, according to personal preference. Even if you aren't planning on picking lavender flowers to use in any way, it's still a good idea to "deadhead" (also known as "clip off") the wasted blossoms once the petals have faded. That will help the plant seem more presentable and encourage it to produce other flowers. The plant known as lavender is a woody plant. Young stems are responsible for paying the plant's most unusual foliage and the blooms that have the most fragrance. In the spring, you should prune plants that are two years old or older by cutting the woody stems back by one-third. That will encourage new growth, resulting in delicate foliage and floral production.

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Seasonal Lavender Care At The End

When lavender is grown to its northernmost extent, protecting the plants from the winter's chill by mulching them in the late fall is the best way to ensure their survival after a freeze; who should apply a layer of bark mulch or wood chips to the plant beds. They will be protected from the cold this way, and there is no risk they may decay. The first thing you should do in the spring has removed the mulch.

Insects and diseases Insects & Diseases: Insects & Diseases: Lavender has such a strong aroma that many insects and animals, including deer and beetles, steer clear of this plant. However, conditions conducive to developing powdery mildew and other fungal infections exist in areas with high humidity. Increasing the distance between plants and placing them in a room with sufficient air circulation may stop fungal infections from ever getting started. That will prevent the leaves from becoming damp and make it less likely that they will become infected with fungus.

There is also the possibility that your lavender will be attacked by other types of insects, such as spittlebugs, whiteflies, and aphids. Use a vigorous stream of water from a hose to wash the insects off the lavender. In addition, sprays made of insecticidal soap will destroy these pests without hurting the other insects, wildlife, or domesticated animals that may be there. Spray the area early on, before the insects, and other pests become a significant problem.

Seasonal Lavender Care At The End

Lavender does not fare well when divided and transplanted, and lavender does not like being cut up. Taking cuttings of lavender in the spring and early summer is the best way to grow the plant. Choose a healthy branch, take a cutting that is 6 inches long, trim the bottom leaves, dip the cut end in rooting hormone powder, and then insert it into a pot that has wet potting soil or sand. Position the bank in an area that receives shade and provides plenty of water until the roots become established.

Layering is another strategy that one may use to disseminate an idea. In the spring, you should scar the lower branch of a healthy lavender plant with a knife where it meets the ground, remove the leaves from the area where the stem is bent so that it touches the ground, and then turn the unit back up to its original position. After applying a rooting hormone powder to the wound and covering it with soil, you should ensure that the remaining portion of the branch is exposed above ground. It is anticipated that it will take root within the following year. After the cutting has established roots, it should be severed from the mother plant and then transplanted to a new place.

If you remove the flower stalks from the lavender plant after it has flowered, the plant will not produce any more lavender. Determine whether or not you want many baby lavenders to grow in that part of the garden; if not, deadhead the plants regularly.

Additional Resources & Information On Lavender

Utilizations in Cooking and Crafting: Lavender may be found in various products, including metals, pharmaceuticals, cosmetics, sachets, potpourris, and fresh and dried flower arrangements. Learn more about the several types of lavender that may be grown as well as the numerous ways it can be used in the kitchen and aromatherapy by reading the following:

Additional Resources & Information On Lavender

Favorite Companions: If you are growing lavender in a perennial garden, plant it with other plants that love full sun and well-drained soil, such as Echinacea (Coneflowers), Sage (Salvia), Artemisia, Thyme, or Ornamental Grasses. Lavender is a member of the Lamiaceae family, which includes mints, chives, and dill. It thrives in a herb garden among other culinary herbs such as culinary oregano, thyme, rosemary, and sage. Roses are traditionally considered to be the perfect complement to lavender. You may produce a magnificent display of pastel hues and fragrant aromas by using it as an underplanting around old-fashioned heritage rose types.

Lavender has a variety of ecological applications; as it brings butterflies, bees, and other helpful insects to the garden, it is an excellent choice for pollinator gardens. Because it contains a significant amount of essential oil, it is also effective as a natural pesticide and deer deterrent.